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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2031/8297

Title: In the mood for ink: how the City Art Gallery shaped our perception of New Ink art as the mainstream 'Hong Kong Art' from the late sixties to early seventies and its political connotations
Authors: Chan, Wing Hang Michael (陳泳鏗)
Law, Kam Ho Richard Charles (羅錦浩)
Lee, Pak Ka Sophia (李柏嘉)
Department: Department of Chinese and History
Issue Date: 2015
Course: CAH4514 Project
Programme: Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Culture and Heritage Management
Supervisor: Dr. Chan, Pui Pedith
Citation: Chan, W. H. M., Law, K. H. R. C., & Lee, P. K. S. (2015). In the mood for ink: How the City Art Gallery shaped our perception of New Ink art as the mainstream ‘Hong Kong Art’ from the late sixties to early seventies and its political connotations (Outstanding Academic Papers by Students (OAPS)). Retrieved from City University of Hong Kong, CityU Institutional Repository.
Abstract: Most literature and academic discussions on the history of Hong Kong Art seem to present an impression of the Hong Kong art scene in the sixties and seventies being dominated by artists associated with the New Ink Movement, an art movement spearheaded by the Chinese ink art artist Lui Shou Kwan and later his protégé Wucius Wong. The first part of this paper examines the ‘Hong Kong Art’ exhibitions organised by the City Art Gallery, the predecessor of the Hong Kong Museum of Art, in the late sixties and early seventies, and details how the City Art Gallery contributed to promoting New Ink Art as the mainstream ‘Hong Kong Art’ through favouring New Ink artists in its exhibitions, at a time when Wucius Wong was the institution’s Assistant Curator. The second part of this paper proposes, with reference to the socio-political context of Hong Kong at the time, that the promotion of New Ink Art might be related to the Colonial Government’s attempt to instil a local identity that echoes the ‘East meets West’ rhetoric promoted by the Administration to downplay Hong Kong’s connection to China after the Leftist Riot in 1967. The ultimate purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the power of museums in influencing our perception of history and identity by deciding who or what to include in exhibitions.
Appears in Collections:OAPS - Dept. of Chinese and History

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